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March 2018
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The Guardian (March 19)

2018/ 03/ 21 by jd in Global News

“As the disastrous impact of leaving the EU becomes clearer, UK citizens should be allowed another say.” Some forecasts estimate that it will take “at least 20 years before the UK economy stabilises after Brexit.” And the London School of Economics “found that all EU countries will lose income after Brexit. The overall GDP fall in the UK is estimated at between £26bn and £55bn, depending on the negotiated settlement. In the most pessimistic scenario, the cost of Brexit could be as high as £6,400 for each household.”


Wall Street Journal (March 18)

2018/ 03/ 20 by jd in Global News

“The batteries that power our modern world—from phones to drones to electric cars—will soon experience something not heard of in years: Their capacity to store electricity will jump by double-digit percentages, according to researchers, developers and manufacturers.”


The Economist (March 17)

2018/ 03/ 19 by jd in Global News

“Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi has become the world’s biggest carmaker,” but “the job of drawing it even closer together will be tricky.”


Reuters (March 16)

2018/ 03/ 18 by jd in Global News

“Simmering fears of a global trade war. An embarrassing political scandal in Japan. Rapid job-turnover inside the White House and the threat of faster interest rate hikes in the United States….” Yet somehow “markets have brushed aside risks and recurring bad news on geopolitics to stay focused on positive macro-economic cues.”


New York Times (March 15)

2018/ 03/ 17 by jd in Global News

“There’s no way to bring back all those steel plants and steel jobs, even if we stopped all imports. Partly that’s because a modern economy doesn’t use that much steel, partly because we can produce steel using many fewer workers, partly because old-fashioned open-hearth plants have been replaced by mini-mills that use scrap metal and aren’t in the same places. So this is all a fantasy.”


Nikkei Asian Review (March 15)

2018/ 03/ 16 by jd in Global News

“Japan Inc. still clings to outdated norms like seniority-based promotion and pay. Women still generally face more ‘non-regular’ job offers than full-time ones. Tokyo’s governance upgrades are no match for opaque practices that fueled false-data scandals at Kobe Steel, Mitsubishi Materials, Toray Industries and elsewhere.”


WARC (March 13)

2018/ 03/ 15 by jd in Global News

“Fifteen-second commercials may be as effective, both rationally and emotionally, as traditional 30-second ones when it comes to brand building, according to new research which challenges received wisdom on how long an ad should be.” The caveat: there must be a valley, peak and resolution or what’s known as a “peak-end,” which “may not actually be suitable for brands in some categories.”


LA Times (March 13)

2018/ 03/ 15 by jd in Global News

“Myanmar has lost its luster for U.S. investors, who say the military has relinquished little power and Aung San Suu Kyi’s democratically elected government has failed to loosen the grip that army generals and their cronies retain over key industries.”


Newsweek (March 12)

2018/ 03/ 14 by jd in Global News

By playing “his America First card,” President Trump thinks he’s getting ahead, particularly in the Rust Belt. He believes adopting tariffs will help fulfill “his promise to America’s industrial heartland to bring back jobs in its traditional industries. The problem is that those in the industrial heartland don’t seem to think it’s the right thing to do.” In fact, many “who work in manufacturing, remain convinced that tariffs will increase costs and lead to job losses. Far from saving the industrial sector, they say, Trump is showing economic illiteracy that will only add to the cost of significant consumer goods.”



Bloomberg (March 9)

2018/ 03/ 12 by jd in Global News

“China is cracking down on pollution like never before, with new green policies so hard-hitting and extensive they can be felt across the world, transforming everything from electric vehicle demand to commodities markets.” China is now, by far, the largest global carbon emitter, but the “government is trying to change that without damaging the economy—and perhaps even use its green policies to become a leader in technological innovation.”


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