RSS Feed

Calendar

November 2018
M T W T F S S
« Oct    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  

Search

Tag Cloud

Archives

The Guardian (August 9)

2018/ 08/ 10 by jd in Global News

“The era of low interest rates will last for at least another 20 years, despite gently rising official borrowing costs in the coming years, one of the Bank of England’s leading policymakers has forecast.” Outgoing monetary policy committee (MPC) member Ian McCafferty said that “structural changes in the global economy meant UK borrowers and savers should get used to interest rates being “significantly” below the 5% average in the 10 years leading up to the financial crisis.”

 

Investment Week (November)

2017/ 11/ 30 by jd in Global News

The recent 0.25% increase “in interest rates announced by the Bank of England leaves us with no more clarity about the direction of monetary policy than we had before the micro-adjustment. Indeed, the increase raises rather more questions than it resolves.” The cut may simply reverse “the rather ill-judged post referendum cut,” Or it could be one off “nod to those worried about inflation becoming more embedded.” Or it could be “the start of a sequence that will see regular increases in rates along a path towards normalisation.”

 

Reuters (November 3)

2017/ 11/ 04 by jd in Global News

“The Bank of England’s first rate rise in over a decade is for now at least a ‘one and done’ move, according to economists in a snap Reuters poll who said the next increase won’t come until after Brexit in March 2019.”

 

Wall Street Journal (November 5)

2015/ 11/ 06 by jd in Global News

“The drumming you hear in Washington, Frankfurt and Tokyo is the accompaniment to the Central Bank Limbo, as the world’s monetary maestros line up to see how low they can go. The Bank of England (BOE) joined the queue Thursday with its announcement that a rate increase will again be delayed.” BOE  Governor Mark Carney warned a year and a half earlier “that a rate rise could come ‘sooner than markets currently expect.’” Nevertheless, “Britain’s monetary-policy committee reverted to dovishness at its meeting this week.”

 

[archive]