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LA Times (July 12)

2018/ 07/ 14 by jd in Global News

“A visit from The Donald is the last thing England needs right now.” There’s a heat wave, wild fires, Britain’s loss in the World Cup, but most of all, it’s the ongoing turmoil over Britain’s departure from the European Union that will set the backdrop to the Descent of the Donald; an event which, for our embattled prime minister, Theresa May, must seem distinctly hellish.”

 

The Guardian (July 8)

2018/ 07/ 10 by jd in Global News

“Theresa May’s fragile deal would be a disaster for Britain.” The Prime Minister secured “a fragile domestic political compromise only by confecting a solution that no one thinks the EU will accept. And even in the unlikely event that the EU were to sign on the dotted line, there is no disguising that while it may be better than dropping out with no deal, the Chequers agreement would be a terrible outcome.” Britain would no longer have a say “in shaping the rules of the world’s most successful trading bloc…in exchange for becoming a rule-taker in whatever scrappy free trade deal we can negotiate.”

 

The Independent (July 3)

2018/ 07/ 05 by jd in Global News

“Any plan to rely on American trade to make up for the loss of EU benefits caused by Brexit are now merely a fantasy. Ironically, the push to remain in the EU might benefit from the US’s lurch toward insanity; the Brexit vote came when people assumed America would have a rational leader at the helm.”

 

Institutional Investors (June 11)

2018/ 06/ 13 by jd in Global News

“When the U.K. secedes from the EU, it will abandon 70 years of globalization. It will turn away from a world order that increasingly relies on supranational institutions to check the power of extremely wealthy individuals and corporations like Apple and Facebook, with market capitalizations far bigger than the GDPs of most nations.” The potential consequences of Brexit leave many in the City of London feeling threatened, but there is “a coterie of hard-right, wealthy businessmen” who are delighted about “rolling back globalization to protect their positions of power — all in the name of populism.”

 

Washington Post (June 8)

2018/ 06/ 10 by jd in Global News

“Trump is waging a trade war in the dumbest way possible.” In the best of times, “trade wars are neither good nor easy to win…. Every side loses, experiencing lost jobs, crippled businesses and higher prices for consumers.” Trumps tariffs are now estimated to result in 16 lost U.S. jobs for every job gained in the aluminum/steel industry: a painful, self-inflicted wound. Moreover, the counterpunches of our trading partners “are likely to draw more blood.” With the “already announced $40 billion worth of retaliatory tariffs on U.S.-made products,” Canada, the EU, Mexico, Russia, India, Japan and Turkey have “fine-tuned the art of minimizing their own pain — and maximizing ours.”

 

Washington Examiner (June 1)

2018/ 06/ 02 by jd in Global News

“With President Trump’s incredibly foolhardy decision Thursday to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum from Canada, Mexico, and the European Union, the probability grows of an economic crash this fall.”

 

Investment Week (April 27)

2018/ 04/ 30 by jd in Global News

The European Union’s Packaged Retail and Insurance-based Investment Products (PRIIPS) regulation “is aimed at helping retail investors better understand and compare the key features, risks, rewards and costs of different products through a short Key Information Document (KID).” However, Andrew Bailey, the chief executive of the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) “has expressed he is ‘concerned’ about the new PRIIPS legislation, highlighting literature requirements ‘are not providing useful context’ while there is evidence it is causing US funds to withdraw from Europe.”

 

The Guardian (March 19)

2018/ 03/ 21 by jd in Global News

“As the disastrous impact of leaving the EU becomes clearer, UK citizens should be allowed another say.” Some forecasts estimate that it will take “at least 20 years before the UK economy stabilises after Brexit.” And the London School of Economics “found that all EU countries will lose income after Brexit. The overall GDP fall in the UK is estimated at between £26bn and £55bn, depending on the negotiated settlement. In the most pessimistic scenario, the cost of Brexit could be as high as £6,400 for each household.”

 

The Guardian (January 10)

2018/ 01/ 11 by jd in Global News

“It has been evident for many months that the government is bluffing, and is developing no substantive contingency plans…. The government pretends that Brexit isn’t happening when the facts do not suit it; refuses to confront the realities staring it in the face; and reacts furiously when the EU declines to imitate its constructive ambiguity, failures of communication and outright delusion.”

 

Business Insider (January 4)

2018/ 01/ 06 by jd in Global News

“Of all the risks facing financial markets in 2018, none is perceived to be greater than a hard Brexit from the European Union. That’s the overwhelming view of HSBC’s client base with a whopping 76% nominating this as the greatest risk facing financial markets this year.”

 

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