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Scientific American (April 11)

2018/ 04/ 13 by jd in Global News

The Atlantic Ocean appears be in “slow motion,” with circulation now the “weakest in 1,600 years.” If further research bears out the conclusion that “hemisphere-spanning currents are slowing, greater flooding and extreme weather could be at hand,” especially on the U.S. east coast, but possibly extending to Europe, which could battle more severe heat waves.

 

USA Today (August 30)

2017/ 09/ 01 by jd in Global News

“Climate change didn’t cause Harvey, but it almost surely made the storm worse.” And extreme weather “isn’t just happening in North America. Even as Harvey riveted the nation’s attention this week, the death toll topped 1,000 from unusually severe monsoonal rains half a world away in Bangladesh, India and Nepal.” With such destruction creating “a torrent of human misery, the question isn’t whether the nation can afford to get serious about global warming. We can’t afford not to.”

 

Institutional Investor (October 29)

2015/ 10/ 29 by jd in Global News

“Just as information from barometers and thermometers can help us prepare for tomorrow’s weather, so corporate information on environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues can help investors make better decisions and prepare for the future” by providing such information “as whether supply chain management takes account of climate risk, whether fixed assets are based in areas prone to flooding and cyclones and whether the scale of a company’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is contributing to more extreme weather events over the long term.” But the problem is “too few companies report on such ESG factors. And when they do, it is often voluntarily reported, which tends to mean different methodologies and measures too inconsistent for investors to compare efficiently.” There is an obvious solution. Global stock exchanges should “coordinate the reporting of sustainability metrics just as they do with financial metrics.”

 

National Geographic (April 1)

2014/ 04/ 02 by jd in Global News

“The world is not ready for the impacts of climate change, including more extreme weather and the likelihood that populated parts of the planet could be rendered uninhabitable,” according to 772 scientists who worked on a report released in Yokohama by the United Nation’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The report “warns that the world is close to missing a chance to limit the global warming that has occurred since the Industrial Revolution.”

 

CFO Magazine (May Issue)

2013/ 05/ 29 by jd in Global News

“In the face of extreme weather and natural disasters, companies are reengineering their supply chains for added reliability.” ATMI, Kimberly-Clark, Royal Caribbean and Ford Motor are just a few of the companies “that have elevated climate change in their enterprise risk management methodologies. Indeed, according to a September 2012 survey by the independent Carbon Disclosure Project, 83% of S&P 500 companies are integrating climate change into ERM processes.”

 

Los Angeles Times (January 8)

2013/ 01/ 11 by jd in Global News

“Last year was the hottest year on record for the contiguous 48 states, marked by near-record numbers of extreme weather events such as drought, wildfire, tornadoes and storms.” Furthermore, a growing body of research now indicates what many have long suspected: “global warming is linked to extreme weather events.”

 

USA Today (November 12)

2012/ 11/ 14 by jd in Global News

“Thanks to computers and smartphones, Americans are more dependent than ever on electricity. But the nation’s 20th century power grid is incompatible with its 21st century economy and increasingly extreme weather.” For days and even weeks, thousands were left in the dark following hurricane Sandy. “The utilities are not powerless. They can bury more key lines, harden substations and protect cellular communications, a vital link when disaster strikes.”

 

Bloomberg (November 2)Bloomberg (November 2)

2012/ 11/ 03 by jd in Global News

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, an independent, endorsed Democratic President Obama. Obama’s position on climate change was a major factor in the endorsement. “Our climate is changing. And while the increase in extreme weather we have experienced in New York City and around the world may or may not be the result of it, the risk that it might be – given this week’s devastation – should compel all elected leaders to take immediate action.”

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, an independent, endorsed Democratic President Obama. Obama’s position on climate change was a major factor in the endorsement. “Our climate is changing. And while the increase in extreme weather we have experienced in New York City and around the world may or may not be the result of it, the risk that it might be – given this week’s devastation – should compel all elected leaders to take immediate action.”

 

Ceres (November 1)

2012/ 11/ 02 by jd in Global News

Losses from Hurricane Sandy may run as high as $50 billion. Ceres has urged “insurance companies to reckon with the economic implications of increasingly unpredictable and extreme weather induced by climate change.” They should take the lead in pushing “for climate-friendly legislation and measures to improve resilience, such as building communities in safer areas and moving electrical equipment in buildings from basements to higher floors.”

 

New York Times (July 10)

2012/ 07/ 12 by jd in Global News

“The recent heat wave that has fried much of the country, ruined crops and led to heat-related deaths has again raised the question of whether this and other extreme weather events can be attributed to human-induced climate change. The answer, increasingly, is a qualified yes.” While individual events such as floods, hurricanes and heat waves cannot be blamed directly on global warming, the consensus is that global warming increases the frequency of these and other extreme weather events.

“The recent heat wave that has fried much of the country, ruined crops and led to heat-related deaths has again raised the question of whether this and other extreme weather events can be attributed to human-induced climate change. The answer, increasingly, is a qualified yes.” While individual events such as floods, hurricanes and heat waves cannot be blamed directly on global warming, the consensus is that global warming increases the frequency of these and other extreme weather events.

 

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