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Investment Week (November)

2017/ 11/ 30 by jd in Global News

The recent 0.25% increase “in interest rates announced by the Bank of England leaves us with no more clarity about the direction of monetary policy than we had before the micro-adjustment. Indeed, the increase raises rather more questions than it resolves.” The cut may simply reverse “the rather ill-judged post referendum cut,” Or it could be one off “nod to those worried about inflation becoming more embedded.” Or it could be “the start of a sequence that will see regular increases in rates along a path towards normalisation.”

 

Bloomberg (November 10)

2016/ 11/ 11 by jd in Global News

The Bank of Japan (BoJ) proved no match for the zero lower bound. “The Bank of Japan’s recent quarterly report says, in effect, that the central bank has done all it can do to raise growth and inflation, and that fiscal policy needs to step in and help.” The BoJ already “owns more than half of the ETF shares in the whole country” and is estimated to soon “be the biggest shareholder in 55 of the 225 companies in the Nikkei index.” Other central banks will follow Japan’s retreat. “The era of bold monetary policy experimentation that began with the global financial crisis is now drawing to a close.”

 

Institutional Investor (May 6)

2016/ 05/ 06 by jd in Global News

Unconventional monetary policy, demographic change, economic challenge and technological disruption are impacting debt markets. “Remarkably, the pool of positively yielding debt in the global fixed-income universe has shrunk by more than $5 trillion in less than two years, which clearly presents a tremendous challenge for investors seeking income and attempting to match assets to liabilities.”

 

Institutional Investor (March 10)

2016/ 03/ 11 by jd in Global News

“As had been widely anticipated, the European Central Bank today announced a cut for all three key benchmark rates and an expansion of the quantitative-easing program.” What remains to be seen is “what further monetary policy course the bank may take if negative rates fail to jump start spending and growth within the common currency zone.”

 

Financial Times (October 5)

2015/ 10/ 06 by jd in Global News

Amidst continuing outflows, emerging markets are much better placed than before the 1997 Asian currency crisis. “Record levels of reserves” should give “troubled countries a window for reform.” Reserves stand roughly 10 times higher than the past crisis. “While no amount of reserves can withstand the loss of market trust, money does buy time. Using reserves to offset capital flight allows central banks temporarily to avoid the classic EM crisis response of tighter monetary policy amid a recession to protect their currency and avoid imported inflation.”

 

Wall Street Journal (September 5)

2014/ 09/ 06 by jd in Global News

“You can’t say Mario Draghi isn’t doing his part.” Trying to deliver another economic “miracle,” the European Central Bank (ECB) President lowered interest rates and increased the negative rate institutions pay on funds deposited with the ECB. “Too bad the politicians keep using Mr. Draghi as an excuse to dodge their responsibility to pass pro-growth reforms…. Europe’s main economic problem is a political class that doesn’t want to address the structural impediments to growth that have nothing to do with monetary policy.”

 

Forbes (August 22)

2014/ 08/ 24 by jd in Global News

Steve Forbes urges India’s new Prime Minister Narendra Modi to first create a “sound and stable currency” through disciplined monetary policy that initially includes a dollar or euro peg. Among his other tips: “Simplify the tax code with a low-rate flat tax” and “Be extremely cautious in attacking subsidies, especially those that benefit the poor, until the economy is in a true boom.”

 

Institutional Investor (January 6, 2014)

2014/ 01/ 06 by jd in Global News

Monetary expansion continues to be the central-bank fashion in much of the developed world. In contrast, the Central Bank of Russia (CBR), “has surprised the market with a hard-line monetary stance.” Instead of stoking short-term economic growth, CBR Governor Elvira Nabiullna is firmly committed to moderating inflation, and “most analysts credit her tight-money policy as the best option under the circumstances.”Monetary expansion continues to be the central-bank fashion in much of the developed world. In  contrast, the Central Bank of Russia (CBR), “has surprised the market with a hard-line monetary stance.” Instead of stoking short-term economic growth, CBR Governor Elvira Nabiullna is firmly committed to moderating inflation, and “most analysts credit her tight-money policy as the best option under the circumstances.”

 

Financial Times (December 10, 2013)

2013/ 12/ 12 by jd in Global News

“South Korea was one of the only winners in the summer’s emerging market sell-off, sparked by fears about the outlook for US monetary policy.” In search of a safe haven, foreign buyers poured into South Korea, but now they are pouring out in favor of more promising markets. “Caught between Japan’s fresh Abenomics-fuelled rally and reform-gripped China, South Korea looks in need of a new narrative.”South Korea, Emerging markets, Sell-off, Outlook, U.S., Monetary policy, Safe haven, Foreign buyers, Abenomics, Rally, Reform, China, South Korea

 

Euromoney (October Issue)

2013/ 10/ 14 by jd in Global News

“As investors lament the unsustainable credit boom and reform inertia that has blighted China, India and Indonesia, in particular, in recent years—raising the spectre this summer of a repeat of the 1997 Asia crisis—Singapore has consolidated its status as the region’s competitive dynamo, thanks to a flurry of supply-side reforms, backed by judicious fiscal and monetary policies.” Singapore’s economy is now “the most competitive in the world, according to the World Bank, with the highest income per capita in southeast Asia, outpacing the US in recent years.”“As investors lament the unsustainable credit boom and reform inertia that has blighted China, India and Indonesia, in particular, in recent years—raising the spectre this summer of a repeat of the 1997 Asia crisis—Singapore has consolidated its status as the region’s competitive dynamo, thanks to a flurry of supply-side reforms, backed by judicious fiscal and monetary policies.” Singapore’s economy is now “the most competitive in the world, according to the World Bank, with the highest income per capita in southeast Asia, outpacing the US in recent years.”

 

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