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Washington Post (January 15)

2019/ 01/ 16 by jd in Global News

“China’s drive to acquire cutting-edge weaponry and establish itself as a global military power poses an increasing threat to American defense superiority.”

 

Bloomberg (January 11)

2019/ 01/ 13 by jd in Global News

“Trade wars, China’s slowdown, erratic stock markets: The outlook is getting grimmer for an increasing number of companies across the globe.”

 

CNN (January 3)

2019/ 01/ 05 by jd in Global News

“Evidence is mounting that the US-China trade war is dealing a blow to the American stock market. Stocks plunged on Thursday after Apple (AAPL) blamed a big sales miss on slowing growth in China and rising trade tensions. China’s massive manufacturing sector… has tumbled into contraction. And trade trouble helped fuel the biggest one-month decline in US factory activity since the Great Recession.”

 

Australian Financial Review (January 2)

2019/ 01/ 03 by jd in Global News

“The Trump administration’s willingness to push the Chinese harder on trade has struck a bilateral chord. Beijing is listening. So far, so good. Now the question is what the US wants to achieve. Answer: the total destruction of China as a competitor. That isn’t a trade goal, and the demands being made contradict one another. This aim also unnecessarily awakens Beijing’s deepest nationalist fears…. Things are likely to get much worse from here.”

 

Reuters (January 2)

2019/ 01/ 02 by jd in Global News

“As U.S. and Chinese delegations prepare for upcoming trade talks in Beijing, the two countries’ disputes over tariffs and trade are rattling markets, businesses, governments, consumers and workers across the globe. All of this corrosive uncertainty was entirely predictable…. Elaborate negotiations take tenacity, expertise and planning. They also take time.”

 

Bloomberg (December 28)

2018/ 12/ 29 by jd in Global News

“Who is the most important and disruptive leader in the world today? Most Americans would probably answer, Donald Trump—with Russia’s Vladimir Putin running a close second.” There is, however “a strong case that China’s Xi Jinping may deserve the title.”

 

Chicago Tribune (December 26)

2018/ 12/ 26 by jd in Global News

“China is both a customer of the United States and a competitor. Friend but possibly foe. The relationship is complex and unresolved…. It may be China’s destiny to match the United States in wealth and firepower. Those are not reasons to fear China. They are reasons to engage the country today as a partner and challenge Chinese intentions when they appear threatening.”

 

Bloomberg (December 21)

2018/ 12/ 23 by jd in Global News

With China’s economy seemingly destined to become the world’s biggest, government missteps look increasingly likely to derail the benefits that would otherwise accrue. “Chief among these self-inflicted wounds would be closing the country to foreign investment, extending state control of the economy and adopting an adversarial relationship with neighboring nations. Ominously, the country seems to doing all of these now, to one extent on another.”

 

The Economist (December 8)

2018/ 12/ 09 by jd in Global News

“Already at risk of unraveling,” the unsteady truce between China and the U.S. has just become more precarious. “Even before news of Ms Meng’s arrest, global stocks see-sawed as investors wondered if hostilities might resume.” For China, at least her arrest “looks like a political salvo. Huawei is a pillar of the Chinese economy—and Ms Meng is the founder’s daughter. The fate of the trade talks could hinge on her encounter with the law.”

 

The Economist (December 1)

2018/ 12/ 01 by jd in Global News

“Personal income tax accounted for only 8% of total tax revenue in China last year, compared with an average of 24% in the OECD, a group of rich countries.” This is largely because tax dodging is ubiquitous. Estimates suggest “only 2% of Chinese pay any income tax.” Since “China has run a budget deficit in 21 of the past 22 years,” however, the government is now making efforts to raise collection to 15%.

 

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