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Investment Week (December 9)

2017/ 12/ 10 by jd in Global News

“The industry has been gripped by fears of an impending market correction for some time now and debating what could cause a pullback, but talk may have been premature as global equity markets continue to hit fresh record highs into the latter stages of 2017.” UK wealth managers have been “more downbeat than their global peers” due to domestic issues like “negotiating Brexit and the potential for a Labour win if another snap General Election is called.”

 

Washington Post (December 7)

2017/ 12/ 09 by jd in Global News

Moving the embassy to Jerusalem could have been used “as a leverage for peace.” Instead, Donald Trump “used it to smash crockery in the region,” which “pretty well summarizes the Trump Doctrine.” Any so called successes “have been things Trump has undone (the Paris climate accord, the Trans-Pacific Partnership) or is in the process of undoing (the Iran nuclear deal, NAFTA). Relations have soured with Britain, continental Europe and countries from Mexico to Australia.” Meanwhile, Russia is gaining power and “the terrorist threat is decentralizing rather than dissipating.”

 

New York Times (December 4)

2017/ 12/ 04 by jd in Global News

“No sooner had Britons found some sorely needed trans-Atlantic cheer in the engagement of their prince charming to an American actress than President Trump dashed it all with his baffling retweet of vile anti-Muslim propaganda from a British neo-fascist group.” Britain reacted to this “slap in the face…with rare all-but-unanimous fury, with members of Parliament denouncing the president as stupid, racist and even fascist.”

 

Reuters (November 13)

2017/ 11/ 14 by jd in Global News

“Great Britain… is in a mess. Between scandals over sex, secret meetings, political donors and the royal family, the government is melting down.”

 

1843 (November Issue)

2017/ 11/ 12 by jd in Global News

“Globalisation has turned citizenship into a commodity.” Estimates suggest that each year, “several thousand people spend a combined $2bn or more…on adding a passport or residence permit to their collection.” Convenience and instability are two of the factors encouraging the acquisition of additional passports, which do not come cheap. “The required investment ranges from upwards of $10,000 (Thai residence, for instance) to more than $10m (fast-track residence in Britain).”

 

The Economist (October 28)

2017/ 10/ 29 by jd in Global News

Unlike Theresa May’s losing gamble, Shinzo Abe’s snap election “paid off handsomely.” The result of the gutsy move was hardly certain. “Rarely has such an unpopular leader won a free and fair election so lopsidedly. Only about one-third of Japanese people approve of Shinzo Abe” while “a whopping 51% disapprove. Yet on October 22nd his Liberal Democratic Party and its coalition partner kept its two-thirds majority in the lower house.” For this unusual outcome, he owes the opposition, which “imploded,” a debt of gratitude.

 

Newsweek (October 25)

2017/ 10/ 27 by jd in Global News

“The power of a U.S. passport has plummeted under President Donald Trump. American passports have now fallen behind those of 18 countries in terms of global mobility—a staggering collapse…. In 2015, the United States tied for first place with the United Kingdom on the list; last year, it slipped to fourth place. Americans now trails 18 countries, including Belgium, Japan, Sweden and first-place Singapore.” Japan tied for fourth place behind Singapore, Germany, Sweden and South Korea.

 

The Straits Times (October 24)

2017/ 10/ 26 by jd in Global News

“It will almost certainly turn out that Britain was more powerful—with more sovereignty—when it was part of a large organisation with international clout.” Following Brexit, the UK will likely be isolated, “with far fewer allies. British consumers, workers and entrepreneurs will pay the price.” But the UK’s fall should provide the rest of the world with a valuable lesson. “The sight of Britain’s sudden banishment to a world where you are better off dealing with cousins will be a useful tonic for everybody else.”

 

IPE Real Assets (October Issue)

2017/ 10/ 23 by jd in Global News

With the uncertainty of Brexit, “REITs have been trading at discounts to net asset value (NAV) of around 15% to 25%.” Faced with scant opportunities, some are electing to return money to unitholders through buybacks or special dividends. But there is clearly a “disconnect between sentiment in the public markets and private markets.” As REITs encounter “limited opportunities in the office space, institutional investors, particularly global investors, have made many high-profile acquisitions.” This includes “the UK’s largest-ever office deal…in July when Hong Kong’s Infinitus Property Investment bought the iconic ‘Walkie Talkie’ building at 20 Fenchurch Street for £1.28bn.”

 

Reuters (October 12)

2017/ 10/ 13 by jd in Global News

“Nerves are fraying in the Brexit talks, negotiators are trying to work out if the other side is bluffing about walking away, and a ticking clock is fast narrowing British options come March 2019.”

 

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