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The Guardian (July 8)

2018/ 07/ 10 by jd in Global News

“Theresa May’s fragile deal would be a disaster for Britain.” The Prime Minister secured “a fragile domestic political compromise only by confecting a solution that no one thinks the EU will accept. And even in the unlikely event that the EU were to sign on the dotted line, there is no disguising that while it may be better than dropping out with no deal, the Chequers agreement would be a terrible outcome.” Britain would no longer have a say “in shaping the rules of the world’s most successful trading bloc…in exchange for becoming a rule-taker in whatever scrappy free trade deal we can negotiate.”

 

The Economist (June 16)

2018/ 06/ 18 by jd in Global News

“The Irish border presents a near-insurmountable roadblock to a hard exit. With less than six months of negotiating time left, it is becoming clear that Brexit will be softer than Mrs May set out. That is good news for Europe and for Britain.”

 

Reuters (June 7)

2018/ 06/ 08 by jd in Global News

“Despite a torrid start to 2018 and with Brexit uncertainties looming large, British blue-chip stocks have jumped to record highs thanks to a weak pound, a torrent of mergers and acquisitions, and bouts of political anxiety in the euro zone.” This is less the result of long-term optimism and more a re-calibration that UK  positions had been marked down excessively.

 

Wall Street Journal (June 4)

2018/ 06/ 05 by jd in Global News

Despite the “unanimous concern and disappointment” expressed in a statement by G7 members Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the UK, ”the Trump administration showed no sign of backing down from restrictive tariffs” or provided any indication “that the administration was wary of inching closer to a trade war.”

 

Financial Times (May 28)

2018/ 05/ 30 by jd in Global News

France, the UK, Japan and other “mid-sized powers must unite to preserve world order.” They “must join forces as the US and China become erratic.”

 

The Guardian (May 13)

2018/ 05/ 14 by jd in Global News

“The American president has thrown into confusion old alliances and imperilled Middle Eastern peace.” His “stark rejection of the multilateral 2015 nuclear deal with Iran poses complex and momentous challenges for Europe, and the UK in particular. This reckless US action upsets the geopolitical furniture in troubling ways. The European democracies now find themselves at odds with their principal ally on an issue of fundamental importance to their security and to peace in the Middle East. By insisting they will uphold the Iran deal… European countries have embarked on a collision course with Washington.”

 

The Independent (April 14)

2018/ 04/ 16 by jd in Global News

“This is a democratic outrage. If parliament–certainly reflecting public opinion on this occasion–would not support air strikes, then British forces should not have taken part in them, no matter how compelling the arguments may seem to the prime minister. We respect the view that the use of chemical weapons should be punished, but the democratic principle must come first.”

 

The Guardian (March 19)

2018/ 03/ 21 by jd in Global News

“As the disastrous impact of leaving the EU becomes clearer, UK citizens should be allowed another say.” Some forecasts estimate that it will take “at least 20 years before the UK economy stabilises after Brexit.” And the London School of Economics “found that all EU countries will lose income after Brexit. The overall GDP fall in the UK is estimated at between £26bn and £55bn, depending on the negotiated settlement. In the most pessimistic scenario, the cost of Brexit could be as high as £6,400 for each household.”

 

Financial Times (March 8)

2018/ 03/ 10 by jd in Global News

“The best trade agreement for the City of London with Europe is the one it has now. EU membership gives the UK unfettered access to a huge market and a voice in making its rules. The results of the Brexit referendum makes this happy situation unlikely to continue. Britain must therefore decide how to protect one of its vital industries.”

 

WARC (March 5)

2018/ 03/ 07 by jd in Global News

Just 2% of UK consumers say they trust marketing and advertising companies with their personal information, according to a recent survey which also suggests people seem resigned to the issue of data privacy being out of their control.

 

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