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Reuters (June 26)

2020/ 06/ 27 by jd in Global News

“World stocks have been on a rollercoaster ride in the first half of 2020. Having slumped 35% from Feb. 20 to March 23, they are now within 10% of February’s record highs thanks to lashings of fiscal stimulus, interest rates slashed to 0% or below in most major economies, and massive amounts of QE. Borrowing costs for high-grade U.S. companies have in fact fallen below January levels.” The rest of the year could bring more roller coaster. “Much depends on whether another coronavirus wave comes crashing down,”

 

NBC News (June 9)

2020/ 06/ 11 by jd in Global News

“Stocks soar despite coronavirus and a recession. It’s time for a reality check, and a crash. Psychological factors are making markets poor gauges of the U.S. economy’s strength. We should wrench our eyeballs from the ticker tape before it’s too late.”

 

Jerusalem Post (June 9)

2020/ 06/ 10 by jd in Global News

“Following “a very steep increase in morbidity” in Israel, “the coronavirus cabinet decided on Monday to freeze nearly all easing of restrictions that were expected in the coming days as the number of active cases continues to climb across the country.”

 

Business Insider (May 2)

2020/ 05/ 03 by jd in Global News

“April was the best month for stocks since 1987. But this stand-out performance” may be misleading. “History is rife with many examples of bear rallies that give way to even deeper losses.”

 

New York Times (February 27)

2020/ 02/ 29 by jd in Global News

“Freaked out by the stock market? Take a deep breath.” This is not a time for drastic portfolio moves unless “there have been drastic changes in your life, like a big new job or consequential medical news.” Otherwise, remember that if you “hold on long enough to a diverse collection of stocks…the system has tended to generously repay patient people over six or seven decades of working, saving and drawing down a portfolio.”

 

Wall Street Journal (February 2)

2020/ 02/ 04 by jd in Global News

“Investors are betting the volatility that has rattled markets over the past two weeks is here to stay. Many are bracing for dramatic swings in stocks as the U.S. presidential election season ramps up and investors assess the impact of the coronavirus outbreak on global economic activity.”

 

FX Street (December 17)

2018/ 12/ 18 by jd in Global News

“USD/JPY, which fell particularly hard today should test 112.40 pre-FOMC but a move below that level may not happen until after the rate decision…. The economy is not doing as poorly as what is reflected by stocks and rate hike expectations…. Barring significant dovishness, any pullback in USD/JPY could be short-lived. Other currency pairs like EUR/USD and GBP/USD are a different story.”

 

The Economist (December 8)

2018/ 12/ 09 by jd in Global News

“Already at risk of unraveling,” the unsteady truce between China and the U.S. has just become more precarious. “Even before news of Ms Meng’s arrest, global stocks see-sawed as investors wondered if hostilities might resume.” For China, at least her arrest “looks like a political salvo. Huawei is a pillar of the Chinese economy—and Ms Meng is the founder’s daughter. The fate of the trade talks could hinge on her encounter with the law.”

 

Financial Times (October 21)

2018/ 10/ 23 by jd in Global News

“Investors should expect decades of selling pressure on Japanese stocks from the most implacable bears in the market: the recently deceased…. The relentless sell-off, which threatens to intensify until the year 2040 as the huge, wealthy postwar baby boom generation expires, arises from an estimate that about 80 per cent of inherited shares are immediately sold by heirs.”

 

Institutional Investor (October 9)

2018/ 10/ 11 by jd in Global News

In the U.S. many “asset management stocks are trading like ‘junk equity,’” despite the relatively buoyant market. And “given the lackluster potential for growth, traditional asset managers’ cheap valuations are unlikely to change soon.”

 

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