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Wall Street Journal (November 5)

2018/ 11/ 06 by jd in Global News

“A wave of stock-picking firms are stepping up their fight against cheap exchange-traded and index funds with new offerings that dial back fees if they can’t beat the market.”

 

Financial Times (October 21)

2018/ 10/ 23 by jd in Global News

“Investors should expect decades of selling pressure on Japanese stocks from the most implacable bears in the market: the recently deceased…. The relentless sell-off, which threatens to intensify until the year 2040 as the huge, wealthy postwar baby boom generation expires, arises from an estimate that about 80 per cent of inherited shares are immediately sold by heirs.”

 

Institutional Investor (October 9)

2018/ 10/ 11 by jd in Global News

In the U.S. many “asset management stocks are trading like ‘junk equity,’” despite the relatively buoyant market. And “given the lackluster potential for growth, traditional asset managers’ cheap valuations are unlikely to change soon.”

 

Equities.com (May 30)

2018/ 06/ 01 by jd in Global News

“Ultimately, we believe at present that the majority of important economic, financial, and market indicators, as well as the established historical pattern, suggest that a final period of rally and exuberance lies ahead before the bull market that began in March 2009 finally ends. It may be that this rally is led by smaller U.S. companies, by non-U.S. companies, or by commodity-oriented stocks. The culmination of the rally could take place later this year, or more probably be delayed until 2019 or 2020.”

 

South China Morning Post (April 2)

2018/ 04/ 03 by jd in Global News

Banks and regulators in China have engaged in a delicate dance between reducing non-performing loans (NPLs) and maintaining profits. “That’s why the NPL ratios of the nation’s key banks all hover at about the same level–now around 1.7 per cent of loans,”  though “Fitch estimates that the real ratio could be as high as 20 per cent, implying total NPLs of 19 trillion yuan (US$3 trillion).” But the regulator is now becoming more demanding in NPL reduction and unforgiving of gimmicks previously employed to hide NPLs. “Given Beijing’s focus on the stability of the financial system, the flow of NPLs into the market should pick up considerably in the next two to three years, providing ample opportunity for new investors.”

 

Financial Times (March 8)

2018/ 03/ 10 by jd in Global News

“The best trade agreement for the City of London with Europe is the one it has now. EU membership gives the UK unfettered access to a huge market and a voice in making its rules. The results of the Brexit referendum makes this happy situation unlikely to continue. Britain must therefore decide how to protect one of its vital industries.”

 

Gizmodo (January 26)

2018/ 01/ 28 by jd in Global News

“We can’t rely on the market to create an ‘electric car revolution’ in Australia. Funding infrastructure, creating industry standards, legislating to reward and cheapen less-polluting cars, and educating the public are all part of the challenge.”

 

Barrons (December 30)

2017/ 12/ 30 by jd in Global News

“Largely absent during the economy’s eight-year recovery from the financial crisis, inflation is on track to pick up in 2018—and it might just catch investors off-guard.” Even a return to modest inflation, e.g. 2.5%, would be a jolt that “could reshuffle the market.”

 

The Economist (November 18)

2017/ 11/ 20 by jd in Global News

“A market exists for rooftop solar panels and electric vehicles; one for removing an invisible gas from the air to avert disaster decades from now does not.” But it must and fast. The need for negative emissions technology “will be gargantuan. The median IPCC model assumes sucking up a total of 810bn tonnes of carbon dioxide by 2100, equivalent to roughly 20 years of global emissions at the current rate. To have any hope of doing so, preparations for large-scale extraction ought to begin in the 2020s.”

 

The Korea Times (August 13)

2017/ 08/ 15 by jd in Global News

“In South Korea, frustration is increasing more over Trump’s loose lips than the North’s provocations. The reason is not that South Koreans have any brotherly love left for their northern neighbors. But from their experience living with the time bomb to the north, they think the real risk comes from Trump’s mouth. Their fear is backed by the market—foreign investors are in a sign of nervousness taking their money out of the country, albeit not at an alarming level so far.”

 

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