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Reuters (June 21)

2018/ 06/ 23 by jd in Global News

“An increasingly shrill exchange of words between the United States and China that is threatening to trigger a global trade war has claimed another victim—- Germany’s auto sector.”

 

Wall Street Journal (June 4)

2018/ 06/ 05 by jd in Global News

Despite the “unanimous concern and disappointment” expressed in a statement by G7 members Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the UK, ”the Trump administration showed no sign of backing down from restrictive tariffs” or provided any indication “that the administration was wary of inching closer to a trade war.”

 

The Drive (May 20)

2018/ 05/ 21 by jd in Global News

Germany “is turning its back on traditionally powered cars and looking towards electric for its future. Data provided by Germany’s Federal Motor Transport Authority…shows a surprisingly sharp upwards trend in EV purchases compared to 2017.” The data also shows diesel sales are “withering” and reveals an unexpected surprise: “Kia’s Soul EV topped the charts by selling 721 units in April, followed by the BMW i3 with 491 cars.”

 

The Economist (April 14)

2018/ 04/ 16 by jd in Global News

“Germany is entering a new era. It is becoming more diverse, open, informal and hip.” As the Merkel era draws to a close, “many of the country’s defining traits—its ethnic and cultural homogeneity, conformist and conservative society, and unwillingness to punch its weight in international diplomacy—are suddenly in flux.”

 

Financial Times (February 12)

2018/ 02/ 13 by jd in Global News

“What happened in the UK in 2016 is now happening in Germany. A referendum is causing total havoc in the political system.” The members of the centre-left Social Democratic party must vote on whether to support the life sustaining coalition cobbled together by Angela Merkel. The party leadership does not appear to have a majority. “Even if there is a narrow vote in favour, it is hard to see how this coalition, and Ms Merkel, can last a full term.”

 

The Economist (November 25)

2017/ 11/ 27 by jd in Global News

“Political uncertainty is bad for Germany and Europe. Germans should vote again.”

 

Bloomberg (November 20)

2017/ 11/ 21 by jd in Global News

“After 12 years in office that have made her Europe’s anchor of stability in times of crisis, Merkel failed to stitch together an alliance that’s never been tried at the national level. While the breakdown leaves her in charge as acting chancellor, the collapse may signal the limit of her pragmatic, non-ideological style of governing and leaves her options for staying in power for another four years dramatically narrowed.”

 

Newsweek (October 25)

2017/ 10/ 27 by jd in Global News

“The power of a U.S. passport has plummeted under President Donald Trump. American passports have now fallen behind those of 18 countries in terms of global mobility—a staggering collapse…. In 2015, the United States tied for first place with the United Kingdom on the list; last year, it slipped to fourth place. Americans now trails 18 countries, including Belgium, Japan, Sweden and first-place Singapore.” Japan tied for fourth place behind Singapore, Germany, Sweden and South Korea.

 

The Economist (September 30)

2017/ 10/ 01 by jd in Global News

“Who leads Europe? At the start of this year, the answer was obvious. Angela Merkel…. This week, it all looks very different.” Post election, Germany’s leader stands greatly reduced. In contrast, “France’s President Emmanuel Macron is bursting with ambition.”  Whether he will be able to “restore France to centre-stage in the EU after a decade in the chorus depends not just on his plans for Europe, but also on his success at home, reforming a country long seen as unreformable.”

 

Financial Times (July 28)

2017/ 07/ 29 by jd in Global News

“More than 420,000 auto jobs in Germany could be imperilled by a 2030 ban on combustion engine cars” that’s currently under debate. “The beguilingly deceptive electric car… might look like any other car from the outside but inside, it is more like a computer on wheels.” For example, UBS analysts discovered a Chevy Bolt “had just 24 moving parts compared with 149 in a VW Golf, mainly because electric motors are so much simpler than combustion engines.” Moreover, it was much cheaper to produce than expected, leading to their conclusion that “with further cost falls likely, electric cars would probably disrupt the industry faster than widely understood.

 

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