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LA Times (November 5)

2018/ 11/ 07 by jd in Global News

Though the “Trump administration slapped tough U.S. sanctions on Iran’s energy, banking and shipping industries,” there are “gaping holes” as the White House “granted waivers to the six largest importers of Iranian oil.” China, India, South Korea, Turkey, Italy and Japan accounted for “more than 75% of Iran’s oil exports last year.”

 

The Economist (November 3)

2018/ 11/ 05 by jd in Global News

It’s “sunrise in Tokyo… After three decades out of fashion, the country’s companies are ready for a revival.” At last, “Japan’s stock market is poised for a comeback.” Japan has had and still has its detractors, but “for the first time in years, Japanese companies are playing a tune that investors are able to whistle.”

 

CNN (October 25)

2018/ 10/ 27 by jd in Global News

“Donald Trump’s unconventional diplomacy is pushing China and Japan closer together…. Still, despite the US hostility” moving the countries “closer together, the two countries’ long and fractious history makes an easy and lasting rapprochement difficult.”

 

Financial Times (October 21)

2018/ 10/ 23 by jd in Global News

“Investors should expect decades of selling pressure on Japanese stocks from the most implacable bears in the market: the recently deceased…. The relentless sell-off, which threatens to intensify until the year 2040 as the huge, wealthy postwar baby boom generation expires, arises from an estimate that about 80 per cent of inherited shares are immediately sold by heirs.”

 

Bloomberg (October 1)

2018/ 10/ 02 by jd in Global News

“Stocks of the so-called sogo shosha, the groups that drove Japan’s postwar export success—the likes of Itochu Corp., Marubeni Corp. and Mitsubishi Corp.—have rallied as much as 36 percent over the last year, outpacing the race to a three-decade high by the broad Topix Index. The trading companies’ free cash-flow levels are above those reached in their heyday, and their leverage much lower.”

 

The Economist (September 22)

2018/ 09/ 23 by jd in Global News

“Mr Abe may be burning to give Japan a more normal foreign policy, but what it needs most is a more normal economy. His signature policy—Abenomics—is far from complete. The fiscal and monetary expansion, his first two “arrows”, were supposed to buy time for the third and most important one: sweeping structural reforms, leading to enduring growth. The economy should take precedence over constitutional reform… Otherwise, Mr Abe will be remembered less for his long tenure than for wasting it.”

 

Time (August 23)

2018/ 08/ 26 by jd in Global News

It is shocking “that more than 65% of Japanese medical doctors who responded to a survey said reducing the entrance exam scores for women is unavoidable, since the extreme working hours make it impossible for female doctors to work full time while taking care of their children. Japanese society still sees household chores and childcare as the main responsibility of women, whether or not they are in paid employment.”

 

South China Morning Post (August 3)

2018/ 08/ 05 by jd in Global News

“China has just ceded its four-year title as the world’s second-largest stock market to Japan, as an intensifying trade spat with the US and its campaign to reduce leverage weighed on equities.”

 

 

New York Times (July 29)

2018/ 07/ 31 by jd in Global News

“While Japan famously brought the world the concept of ‘death from overwork,’ South Koreans work longer hours, according to labor data. In fact, they put in 240 more work hours per year than Americans do — or, put another way, an extra month of eight-hour workdays.” South Korea is now trying to break free of this convention with a new law mandating 52-hour workweek caps for a large number of employees.

 

Reuters (July 29)

2018/ 07/ 30 by jd in Global News

“The Bank of Japan meets on Tuesday and might be doing some ‘jinarashi’ i.e. preparing markets for some changes to its unique, ultra-loose monetary policy.” With five years of mixed results, as well as “a global trade war now threatening trouble for its big exporters and zero interest rates hurting its banks, the BOJ seems to have recognized that something needs to give.”

 

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