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Bloomberg (December 21)

2018/ 12/ 23 by jd in Global News

With China’s economy seemingly destined to become the world’s biggest, government missteps look increasingly likely to derail the benefits that would otherwise accrue. “Chief among these self-inflicted wounds would be closing the country to foreign investment, extending state control of the economy and adopting an adversarial relationship with neighboring nations. Ominously, the country seems to doing all of these now, to one extent on another.”

 

Reuters (December 18)

2018/ 12/ 20 by jd in Global News

“British business has issued a stark warning to MPs that they risk plunging an ill-prepared economy into chaos unless they stop playing politics at Westminster…. As ministers agreed to a dramatic escalation of preparations for a no-deal Brexit, including putting 3,500 armed forces personnel on standby, the leaders of the UK’s five leading employers’ groups said the country was nowhere near ready.”

 

FX Street (December 17)

2018/ 12/ 18 by jd in Global News

“USD/JPY, which fell particularly hard today should test 112.40 pre-FOMC but a move below that level may not happen until after the rate decision…. The economy is not doing as poorly as what is reflected by stocks and rate hike expectations…. Barring significant dovishness, any pullback in USD/JPY could be short-lived. Other currency pairs like EUR/USD and GBP/USD are a different story.”

 

Wall Street Journal (December 4)

2018/ 12/ 05 by jd in Global News

“A carbon tax is in theory a more efficient way than regulation to reduce carbon emissions. But after decades of global conferences, forests of reports, dire television documentaries, celebrity appeals, school-curriculum overhauls and media bludgeoning, voters don’t believe that climate change justifies policies that would raise their cost of living and hurt the economy.”

 

The Economist (November 24)

2018/ 11/ 25 by jd in Global News

“American families are increasingly hard to distinguish from European ones.” Though the economy has improved, “births continue to drop. America’s total fertility rate, which can be thought of as the number of children the average woman will bear, has fallen from 2.12 to 1.77. It is now almost exactly the same as England’s rate, and well below that of France.”

 

New York Times (November 17)

2018/ 11/ 19 by jd in Global News

“Everything is up in the air in the Britain’s tumultuous politics right now.” The Brexiteers “savage Mrs. May’s deal and offer no practical suggestions for anything else. This is an utter failure of responsibility. Yes, the prime minister’s deal is pitiful, an awkward compromise that will hobble Britain’s economy and diminish our power. But the truth is—and everyone knows this—there is no better, purer Brexit available without a permanent economic hit.”

 

Wall Street Journal (October 26)

2018/ 10/ 28 by jd in Global News

The European Central Bank is now faced with “a dilemma as it edges toward higher interest rates just as the region’s economy slows and faces escalating risks, from international trade tensions to a European dispute over Italy’s budget.” For now, President Mario Draghi has no plans to change course as the ECB seeks to “phase out easy-money policies.”

 

Reuters (October 17)

2018/ 10/ 18 by jd in Global News

“Financial markets have some things in common with professional sport. Investors and fans are both desperate for winners and despondent about losing. They are passionate about little ups and downs, while outsiders often find the rules arcane and the enthusiasm weird. And for both, all the jumping and screaming has little effect on the rest of the economy.”

 

The Economist (September 22)

2018/ 09/ 23 by jd in Global News

“Mr Abe may be burning to give Japan a more normal foreign policy, but what it needs most is a more normal economy. His signature policy—Abenomics—is far from complete. The fiscal and monetary expansion, his first two “arrows”, were supposed to buy time for the third and most important one: sweeping structural reforms, leading to enduring growth. The economy should take precedence over constitutional reform… Otherwise, Mr Abe will be remembered less for his long tenure than for wasting it.”

 

Bloomberg (September 7)

2018/ 09/ 07 by jd in Global News

“One of the paradoxes of this year’s trade tensions is that in many parts of the world, it doesn’t yet feel like a crisis.” Although it may be “tempting to think the global economy is riding out the turmoil,” it would be “mistaken. Look closely: The slowdown has begun.”

 

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