RSS Feed

Calendar

December 2017
M T W T F S S
« Nov    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031

Search

Tag Cloud

Archives

The Economist (September 30)

2017/ 10/ 01 by jd in Global News

“Who leads Europe? At the start of this year, the answer was obvious. Angela Merkel…. This week, it all looks very different.” Post election, Germany’s leader stands greatly reduced. In contrast, “France’s President Emmanuel Macron is bursting with ambition.”  Whether he will be able to “restore France to centre-stage in the EU after a decade in the chorus depends not just on his plans for Europe, but also on his success at home, reforming a country long seen as unreformable.”

 

Financial Times (April 19)

2017/ 04/ 21 by jd in Global News

“After 15 years of Mr Erdogan’s tightening grip, first as prime minister and now as president, almost half the population said a resounding No to one-man rule.” Still, they did not prevail. “What Turks now face is not a French or US-style presidency but something like Vladimir Putin’s Kremlin rule — and half the country knows this well.”

 

Washington Post (April 7)

2017/ 04/ 08 by jd in Global News

The United States, France, the EU, China, India and 136 other parties have ratified the Paris agreement, which went into force in November. “Now is the time to implement it—to actually reduce our greenhouse-gas emissions, to ensure that policies match national commitments. It is time to develop and market clean technologies, and to seize new national and international economic opportunities.” But the “global fight cannot succeed if all parties are not fully on board and if they don’t assume their share of the burden or seek to capitalize on the opportunities.”

 

CNN (March 9)

2017/ 03/ 11 by jd in Global News

“Its motto is “More than a club” and Spain’s Barcelona produced more than a result Wednesday routing France’s Paris Saint-Germain 6-1 to qualify for the Champions League quarterfinals.” Many had given up on the team, but Barca became “the first team to overturn a first-leg 4-0 deficit in the history of the Champions League.”

 

Time (July 15)

2016/ 07/ 17 by jd in Global News

First there was the Charlie Hebdo attack that killed 17 people. “Then came the Paris attacks—a devastating blow, from which the country had only just begun to shake off the anxiety and grief.” And now the deadly tragedy in Nice. All within a year and a half. “For France, the attack on Thursday night is likely to be deeply distressing—and to raise the question about how the country can possible avoid further attacks, given the extraordinary security measures already in place.”

 

Reuters (December 14)

2015/ 12/ 16 by jd in Global News

The world finally “learned its lesson and got a climate deal.” The victory in Paris “was an agreement born from a fear of failure, delivered by the smoothness of French diplomacy.” Remarkably, it took place just six years after “countries had bitterly walked away from global climate talks in Copenhagen without a deal.”

 

New York Times (November 15)

2015/ 11/ 16 by jd in Global News

“The coldblooded depravity with which the terrorists gunned down people seated at restaurant tables and picked off hostages in the Bataclan concert hall where more than 80 were killed was horrifying. But Parisians have remained defiant and united…. This attack will harden the resolve of the French against the savagery of the Islamic State, as it must the world’s.”

 

Wall Street Journal (March 23)

2015/ 03/ 24 by jd in Global News

“French voters still don’t have a convincing pro-growth option.” While “Sunday’s first round of voting in French municipal elections won’t much affect national policy… it does send a signal about where the electorate stands.” The majority voted “for manifestos that would consign France to more economic stagnation.”

 

The Economist (March 7)

2015/ 03/ 08 by jd in Global News

“Twenty-five years after the Soviet collapse, the world is entering a new nuclear age. Nuclear strategy has become a cockpit of rogue regimes and regional foes jostling with the five original nuclear-weapons powers (America, Britain, France, China and Russia), whose own dealings are infected by suspicion and rivalry.” The new nuclear age is far more unstable. “During much of the cold war the two superpowers, anxious to avoid Armageddon, were willing to tolerate the status quo. Today the ground is shifting under everyone’s feet.”

 

New York Times (February 23)

2015/ 02/ 24 by jd in Global News

“The heavy parliamentary weapon France’s Socialist government deployed to ram an economic reform bill through opposition in its own ranks might seem excessive for a measure that basically lets some stores stay open on some Sundays.” This raises the question of how President François Hollande will proceed when the “far tougher package of tax breaks, easing of labor laws and other reforms is due later this year.”

 

« Older Entries

[archive]