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New York Times (January 9)

2019/ 01/ 11 by jd in Global News

“When it comes to the border and the wall, Trump’s willful estrangement from reality is so profound that network executives and newspaper editors spent part of Tuesday in strategy sessions about how to respond to his inevitable barrage of falsehoods. Should there be a crawl of words on the bottom of the television screen to correct him in real time? Could fact checkers work speedily enough to post rebuttals online…? This is where we find ourselves. Other presidents have been untrustworthy, and others have had to be called out on it. But not like this. This is surreal.”

 

The Economist (June 16)

2018/ 06/ 18 by jd in Global News

“The Irish border presents a near-insurmountable roadblock to a hard exit. With less than six months of negotiating time left, it is becoming clear that Brexit will be softer than Mrs May set out. That is good news for Europe and for Britain.”

 

Time (August 31)

2017/ 09/ 02 by jd in Global News

“More missile tests, more bomber flyovers and three angry armies facing each other across the world’s most heavily armed border raises the possibility that a miscalculation could lead to real fighting.”

 

Institutional Investor (October 10)

2014/ 10/ 11 by jd in Global News

“As refugees from Syria and Iraq flood across the border and, the real economy suffers, Lebanon’s central bank is looking to start-up lending as a way to boost growth.” Despite an influx of 1.3 million refugees (roughly a third of its pre-crisis population), Lebanon’s “economy has remained intact. Growth, while meager, is still projected to reach 1.8 percent this year….Much of this resilience is down to the creativity of the central bank” and the novel approaches it is adopting.

 

 

Financial Times (October 8)

2014/ 10/ 08 by jd in Global News

Isis looks poised to capture Kobani and much of Syria’s border with Turkey. Will this finally jolt Turkey’s president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, out of his ambivalence? “If he is to retain the confidence of his longstanding allies, Mr Erdogan should move decisively against Isis and put an end to international perceptions that he is willing to dally with this deadly foe.”

 

Washington Post (June 26)

2014/ 06/ 27 by jd in Global News

With “gestures suggesting de-escalation,” Vladimir Putin has been working to avoid additional sanctions. But “Russia’s behavior remains unacceptably provocative. Russia continues to occupy Ukrainian territory in Crimea, it has not applied its influence to end the uprising it sponsored in eastern Ukraine and it continues to deploy forces to Ukraine’s border.”

 

New York Times (November 1)

2013/ 11/ 01 by jd in Global News

An ongoing border dispute between India and China has led to war and confrontation. A recent agreement, however, “gives both sides an incentive to review their now very different maps of the region and settle on a permanent border. Until that happens, the possibility of serious conflict remains very real.”

 

Financial Times (April 29)

2010/ 04/ 30 by jd in Global News

Russia settled a long-running border dispute with Norway. While the land border separating the two countries has been fixed since 1826, the maritime border has been hotly disputed. The two countries will split the sea equally, with the maritime border extending from the coast to the North Pole. With the boundary dispute settled, oil companies will be less hesitant to invest in exploration around the Barents Sea. Even more importantly, the Financial Times hopes this signals renewed commitment by Russia to the “rule of law.”

Russia settled a long-running border dispute with Norway. While the land border separating the two countries has been fixed since 1826, the maritime border has been hotly disputed. The two countries will split the sea equally, with the maritime border extending from the coast to the North Pole. With the boundary dispute settled, oil companies will be less hesitant to invest in exploration around the Barents Sea. Even more importantly, the Financial Times hopes this signals renewed commitment by Russia to the “rule of law.”

 

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