RSS Feed

Calendar

October 2018
M T W T F S S
« Sep    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

Search

Tag Cloud

Archives

Reuters (August 16)

2018/ 08/ 19 by jd in Global News

“Banks still have to work to rebuild public trust, despite years of restructuring and paying fines and compensation for misbehaviour.” A YouGov survey found that “66 percent of adults in Britain do not trust banks to work in the best interests of society.”

 

Fortune (January 4)

2018/ 01/ 05 by jd in Global News

“By the end of the first three working days of the year, the U.K.’s top bosses will each have earned on average as much as a typical worker will take home in all of 2018, according to a report. While the difference in compensation appears stark, it narrowed slightly compared with the previous year.” Studies show “earnings for CEOs in the U.K.’s benchmark FTSE 100 dropped by a fifth in 2016 to 4.5 million pounds ($5.4 million)” and that the CEO-to-worker pay ratio stood at around 120 to 1, much lower than the 347 to 1 of S&P 500 companies.

 

Wall Street Journal (April 7)

2016/ 04/ 09 by jd in Global News

“Compensation for the chief executives of the biggest U.S. companies fell more sharply last year than any year since the financial crisis, as weaker corporate performance slowed cash bonuses and accounting rules pared back pension growth.” CEO pay at the largest companies dropped by “3.8% to $10.8 million last year from $11.2 million in 2014.”

 

New York Times (July 14)

2013/ 07/ 16 by jd in Global News

“The median compensation of chief executives at 200 of the nation’s biggest public companies came in at $15.1 million last year, a 16 percent jump from 2011…. The pay packages — including salary, bonus, benefits, stock and option grants — ranged from $96.2 million at Oracle to $11.1 million at General Motors.” Until the SEC determines rules for Dodd-Frank disclosure requirements, however, we won’t know just how excessive these packages are. Corporations should disclose pay gap information so investors, consumers, economists and others can monitor the ratio of C.E.O. pay to regular employee pay, which by some estimates now stands at between 200 and 300 to 1 in the U.S.“The median compensation of chief executives at 200 of the nation’s biggest public companies came in at $15.1 million last year, a 16 percent jump from 2011…. The pay packages — including salary, bonus, benefits, stock and option grants — ranged from $96.2 million at Oracle to $11.1 million at General Motors.” Until the SEC determines rules for Dodd-Frank disclosure requirements, however, we won’t know just how excessive these packages are. Corporations should disclose pay gap information so investors, consumers, economists and others can monitor the ratio of C.E.O. pay to regular employee pay, which by some estimates now stands at between 200 and 300 to 1 in the U.S.

 

New York Times (July 4)New York Times (July 4)

2012/ 07/ 06 by jd in Global News

The exact role of a director remains something subject to debate. “At Fortune 500 companies last year, the median compensation for a director was $212,512. Other boards pay less but are apparently also less demanding; in the Caymans, one person is a director of about 260 hedge funds.”The exact role of a director remains something subject to debate. “At Fortune 500 companies last year, the median compensation for a director was $212,512. Other boards pay less but are apparently also less demanding; in the Caymans, one person is a director of about 260 hedge funds.”

 

Financial Times (April 18)

2012/ 04/ 19 by jd in Global News

In the U.S., ‘say-on-pay’ votes were first required last year. On Tuesday, Citi’s shareholders voted down the proposed compensation package, becoming “the first big US bank to suffer majority dissent in a ‘say-on-pay’ vote and only the 12th S&P 500 company to lose such a ballot.” Citi joins a growing list of companies where shareholders rejected proposed compensation. “Last year 41 companies in the Russell 3000 – including Hewlett-Packard, Jacobs Engineering and Stanley Black & Decker – failed to receive majority support in such votes.”

In the U.S., ‘say-on-pay’ votes were first required last year. On Tuesday, Citi’s shareholders voted down the proposed compensation package, becoming “the first big US bank to suffer majority dissent in a ‘say-on-pay’ vote and only the 12th S&P 500 company to lose such a ballot.” Citi joins a growing list of companies where shareholders rejected proposed compensation. “Last year 41 companies in the Russell 3000 – including Hewlett-Packard, Jacobs Engineering and Stanley Black & Decker – failed to receive majority support in such votes.”

 

Pensions & Investments (June 13)

2011/ 06/ 15 by jd in Global News

“Say on pay” is helping governance grow up in the U.S. In the past investors upset over executive compensation might withhold votes for each member of the compensation committee. Now that they can directly vote against the compensation packages, corporate directors are being re-elected at the highest level of approval (95.3%) in half a decade. As Anne Simpson of CalPERS stated, “We’ve seen less megaphone diplomacy…. But we’ve seen a significant increase in real conversation, real dialogue” between shareholders and companies.

 

[archive]