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Investment Week (November)

2017/ 11/ 30 by jd in Global News

The recent 0.25% increase “in interest rates announced by the Bank of England leaves us with no more clarity about the direction of monetary policy than we had before the micro-adjustment. Indeed, the increase raises rather more questions than it resolves.” The cut may simply reverse “the rather ill-judged post referendum cut,” Or it could be one off “nod to those worried about inflation becoming more embedded.” Or it could be “the start of a sequence that will see regular increases in rates along a path towards normalisation.”

 

The Independent (November 26)

2017/ 11/ 27 by jd in Global News

“Brexit has been a long, slow process in accepting the reality that should have been better understood before the referendum. In the next three weeks, some things will become brutally clear that should have been obvious long ago.” Theresa May’s path to the next EU Council on December 14 will be “strewn with unpalatable truths.” The £40bn exit bill and continuing sovereignty of EU law during the transition are just the beginning. “As it turns out, it may be that the more difficult intrusion of reality into the Brexit negotiations is the question of the Irish border.”

 

Reuters (September 28)

2017/ 09/ 30 by jd in Global News

“Along with the ongoing decimation of Iraq’s Sunni population,” the Kurdish referendum “means that in practice ‘Iraq’ no longer exists. In its place is a Shiite state dominated by Iran, the de facto new nation of Kurdistan, and a shrinking population of Sunnis tottering between annihilation or reservation-like existence, depending on whether the United States uses the last of its influence to sketch out red lines or abandons the people to fate.”00

 

The Economist (July 22)

2017/ 07/ 23 by jd in Global News

“Despite the frantic political activity in Westminster…the country has made remarkably little progress since the referendum in deciding what form Brexit should take. All versions, however “hard” or “soft”, have drawbacks…. Yet Britain’s leaders have scarcely acknowledged that exit will involve compromises, let alone how damaging they are likely to be. The longer they fail to face up to Brexit’s painful trade-offs, the more brutal will be the eventual reckoning with reality.”

 

The Economist (March 18)

2017/ 03/ 20 by jd in Global News

“Westminster is unlikely to refuse the request” for another Scottish referendum. Refusal “would add to the already-damaging perception of an English-dominated government that ignores Scotland. Once again a Conservative prime minister faces the prospect of presiding over the break-up of the union. And this time it is against the backdrop of perhaps the most complex international negotiations Britain has ever undertaken, as it leaves the European Union.”

 

Financial Times (December 31)

2017/ 01/ 01 by jd in Global News

“After December’s No vote in the Italian referendum, the rise of Donald Trump and the British vote to leave the EU, it appears that the political landscape of the developed world is being redesigned by the victims of globalisation and technological change. Anger towards political elites is pervasive. Yet a few rage-free zones remain, of which Japan is the most conspicuous.” Japan’s “immunity from the populist political tide remains remarkable.”

 

Financial Times (July 26)

2016/ 07/ 27 by jd in Global News

“There is a welcome sense among the world’s policymakers—at least, those outside the UK—that life is returning to the pre-EU referendum normal. The tasks of the Fed and the BoJ are not easy, particularly for the latter. But at least the challenges and the risks involved are looking a great deal more familiar.”

 

Institutional Investor (June 23)

2016/ 06/ 24 by jd in Global News

“The referendum on U.K. membership in the European Union continues to dominate market risk narratives, with both equity futures and the pound sterling strengthening in early trading, suggestion a degree of confidence among investors that the nation will remain in the EU.”

 

Chicago Tribune (July 11)

2015/ 07/ 11 by jd in Global News

“By voting no in last Sunday’s referendum, and by such an impressive margin, Greece won itself a moment’s elation — and may come to regret the consequences for years. It was one more in an absurdly extended series of miscalculations.”

 

The Economist (May 16)

2015/ 05/ 17 by jd in Global News

The referendum to stay in the EU is “winnable. Over the next year or so Mr Cameron and his chancellor, George Osborne, can probably extract enough from their partners to persuade Britons to vote to stay in. Yet that victory must be just a first step. The real agenda—the one that matters to Britain’s prosperity and to the EU as a whole—will take longer to bear fruit.”

 

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