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Washington Post (June 29)

2020/ 06/ 29 by jd in Global News

“The road to a successful reopening of the U.S. economy is strewn with hopeful intentions — and formidable obstacles. The biggest and most important obstacle is a surge in new coronavirus cases, which presumably will lead to more hospitalizations and more deaths as well as more firms shutting down.”

 

Wall Street Journal (April 16)

2020/ 04/ 18 by jd in Global News

“Can we please stop talking about “reopening” the U.S. economy?… There is no on-off switch. Swaths of the economy—restaurants, travel, retail shops—were already shrinking before governments ordered them shut, because people were afraid to dine, travel or shop. These fears will abate gradually, with the pace dictated by the course of the virus, not by anybody’s decree.”

 

Institutional Investor (March 25)

2020/ 03/ 26 by jd in Global News

Due to the “historic buying opportunity,” a few “hedge funds legends” are “quietly contacting investors” These “superstar managers” are “making an exception” and reopening their funds to new investors citing “the massive drop in asset prices catalyzed by the novel coronavirus pandemic.”

 

Wall Street Journal (March 9)

2016/ 03/ 09 by jd in Global News

Five years have passed since the nuclear meltdown, but “Fukushima still rattles Japan.” The nation must debate the controversial “reopening of reactors” that have largely been shuttered since the accident, even as “costly cleanup and decommissioning” are scheduled to continue for decades at Fukushima.

 

Washington Post (October 15)

2013/ 10/ 16 by jd in Global News

“A reopening, for now, of government, a postponement for a few months of a possible default on federal debts, a promise to negotiate again over fiscal disagreements — in a rational, functional world, these meager accomplishments would not be cause for celebration. In today’s Washington, they would count as achievements.”“A reopening, for now, of government, a postponement for a few months of a possible default on federal debts, a promise to negotiate again over fiscal disagreements — in a rational, functional world, these meager accomplishments would not be cause for celebration. In today’s Washington, they would count as achievements.”

 

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