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Investment Week (September 14)

2020/ 09/ 16 by jd in Global News

The “Next Generation EU” deal provides ESG investors with much to watch. The €550bn “centerpiece of the stimulus” focuses on fighting climate change through “expenditures earmarked for promoting energy efficiency and developing renewable energy resources, emission-free vehicles, and sustainable transport, alongside other measures of environmental protection designed to help meet Europe’s 2050 climate neutrality pledge.”

 

Fast Company (December 24)

2017/ 12/ 26 by jd in Global News

Despite fears of a brick-and-mortar retail apocalypse, many retailers “are flourishing in the age of Amazon. After all, more than 90% of retail sales still happen in the real world, and as relentless as Bezos is, it’s not likely he’ll swallow up all of brick-and-mortar on his own. The truth is that the bigger Amazon gets, the more opportunity it creates for fresh, local alternatives. The more Amazon pushes robot-powered efficiency, the more space there is for warm and individualized service.”

 

The Atlantic (July/August Issue)

2017/ 08/ 10 by jd in Global News

Although Donald Trump called Kim “a madman with nuclear weapons,” North Korea’s leader “appears to be neither suicidal nor crazy.” In fact, “he has acted with brutal efficiency to consolidate that power; the assassination of his half brother is only the most recent example. As tyrants go, he’s shown appalling natural ability…. his moves have been nothing if not deliberate and even cruelly rational.” With only bad options for dealing with the North, this is “perhaps the most reassuring thing.”

 

The Economist (May 20)

2017/ 05/ 22 by jd in Global News

The WannaCry attack reads like the script to “a Hollywood disaster film.” Even though it had a relatively happy ending, “the incident rammed home two unpleasant truths about the computerised world. The first is that the speed, scalability and efficiency of computers are a curse as well as a blessing.” Digital data “can be sent around the world in milliseconds,” both a blessing and a bane. “The second unpleasant truth is that opportunities for mischief will only grow.” As we embrace the internet or things, vulnerabilities will multiply “as computers find their way into everything from cars and pacemakers to fridges and electricity grids.”

 

Institutional Investor (June 1)

2016/ 06/ 02 by jd in Global News

Nearly a decade after the financial crisis, financial institutions still face challenges. However, the “savvy” ones are simplifying their structures and realizing efficiency gains. “For the past nine years, investments have poured into regulatory compliance and reporting initiatives. The rapid development of disruptive technologies such as robotics and artificial intelligence is helping firms automate many of those processes and redirect their energy toward growth activities. Big data, analytics and digital technology shed light on what they do best—and most profitably—and enhance the customer experience.”

 

New York Times (November 23)

2014/ 11/ 24 by jd in Global News

“We don’t need to change course, or kill jobs, or wage war on anybody or anything” to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. All we need to do is continue increasing energy efficiency, which has been key to economic progress. “Without energy productivity improvements, America’s energy needs would have tripled since 1970…. Actual growth was only one-fifth of that. Energy efficiency has emerged as the largest and cheapest alternative to burning fossil fuels to generate electricity.”

 

PC World (June 6)

2012/ 06/ 07 by jd in Global News

The newest internet protocol (IPv6) launched today. IPv6 replaces IPv4 which will continue to be supported. IPv6 provides better efficiency and security, and solves a major problem. IPv4 only offered 4.3 billion addresses and they’ve all been used. “IPv6 uses 128-bit addresses and is capable of 340 undecillion addresses. That is 340 times 10 to the 36th power, or 340 trillion trillion trillion possible IP addresses.”

 

Wall Street Journal (April 8)

2012/ 04/ 10 by jd in Global News

As a group, S&P companies have gained efficiency while rebounding to pre-recession levels. “S&P 500 companies have become more efficient—and more productive. In 2007, the companies generated an average of $378,000 in revenue for every employee on their payrolls. Last year, that figure rose to $420,000.” These same companies have also increased capital expenditures, reduced debt and increased cash on hand.

As a group, S&P companies have gained efficiency while rebounding to pre-recession levels. “S&P 500 companies have become more efficient—and more productive. In 2007, the companies generated an average of $378,000 in revenue for every employee on their payrolls. Last year, that figure rose to $420,000.” These same companies have also increased capital expenditures, reduced debt and increased cash on hand.

 

Boston Globe (November 26)

2011/ 11/ 27 by jd in Global News

Domestic car makers are balking over proposed fuel efficiency requirements designed to bring corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards up to 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025. The standards should be enacted. “Technology has caught up with every previous standard, allowing Americans to save fuel while still driving the largest vehicles in the world….The result will be a major step toward independence from foreign oil, with the least possible disturbance of American driving habits.”Domestic car makers are balking over proposed fuel efficiency requirements designed to bring corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards up to 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025. The standards should be enacted. “Technology has caught up with every previous standard, allowing Americans to save fuel while still driving the largest vehicles in the world….The result will be a major step toward independence from foreign oil, with the least possible disturbance of American driving habits.”

 

Bloomberg (May 26)

2011/ 05/ 29 by jd in Global News

Solar is sliding down the cost curve even as cell efficiency climbs. Solar may soon beat the electricity rates set by utilities. “The cost of solar cells, the main component in standard panels, has fallen 21 percent so far this year, and the cost of solar power is now about the same as the rate utilities charge for conventional power in the sunniest parts of California, Italy and Turkey.”

 

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